"I don't have a problem with anyone being rich. I have a problem with people who cannot feel they are rich unless everyone else is made to be poor." -- Michael Rivero

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 English inventor Sir Henry Bessemer, famous for his groundbreaking steelmaking process, which still bears his name, once lamented, "Few men suffer more seriously from seasickness than I do." Have suffered." Despite being one of the leading inventors of the Second Industrial Revolution, Bessemer's genius was not immune to personal trials. With over a hundred inventions in iron, steel and glass, most of which saw success, his attempt to build a ship to alleviate his chronic seasickness, however, ended in failure.


 

 Until about a century ago, in the Western world, you couldn't tell whether a small child was a girl or a boy by her clothing. All little children, regardless of their gender, dressed alike, with girls' clothes, girlish shoes, long hair and ponytails. Pants or breeches were not worn until boys were at least four years old, but some continued to wear skirts, gowns and petticoats until they were old enough – about eight years old. By age. By that time, boys would eagerly wait to wear their first pair of trousers.

This incredible facial hair not only won people's hearts but also secured his place in history as he held the record for the longest beard ever grown in France.

Legend has it that Lewis had been shaving since he was 12, but his razor blades could not keep up with his rapidly growing beard.

By the time he was 14, his beard had reached 50 centimeters (19.6 in) in length. From then on, it was just a matter of letting it grow to monstrous proportions.

Welcome to the fascinating world of the Amish community, where traditions and beliefs that have been passed down for centuries often surprise, confuse, and sometimes even shock outsiders. In this slideshow gallery, we'll explore the rituals and beliefs that define the Amish lifestyle. From the interesting practice of "bundling" to the strange fashion choices of growing a beard while shaving off the moustache, we will shed light on the reasons behind these customs.


 


This unique photo collection includes a stunning array of vintage cameras, some of which were ingeniously hidden in everyday objects.
 

From a camera hidden in a matchbox to a camera disguised as a pocket watch for covert operations, these devices showcase simple old-fashioned designs, some dating back to the 1880s.
 

Some of these special cameras were made to look like books, cigarette packets, binoculars, radio players, and even a handgun.
 

You've heard that a picture is worth a thousand words, but pictures like the ones in the collection here have a lot of stories to tell. These photographs give an insight into what life was like in such disparate eras as the 18th century and the 1970s. You'll see what life was like for a child in America during the Baby Boom, and how Native Americans lived long before the modern metropolis existed. These rare historical finds are not only informative, but they also offer a fun look at a time long gone, and probably a time you wish you could go back to. Be prepared to be surprised and read on!
As the United States expanded westward in the early 1800s, the trade in American bison fur, skin, and meat began to flourish across the Great Plains. By the 1860s, these iconic animals had roamed the plains for millennia, their herds numbering in the millions, a sight so awe-inspiring that it was dubbed "the thunder of the plains." For generations, they have been the lifeblood of Native American tribes, providing not only food and clothing but also shelter and spiritual significance. But the scenario began to change after the Civil War.

 Step into a Technicolor time machine and travel back to the '60s, where television screens were alive with groovy characters and far-fetched storylines. From modern day spies to outer space adventures, the small screen was a canvas of limitless creativity and imagination. In an era filled with innovation, classic TV shows of the 60s continue to fascinate audiences with their vintage charm and timeless appeal.


 

In the 19th century, access to medicine was like opening Pandora's Box – it brought both blessings and strange, sometimes dangerous, tricks. Some "cures" were harmless frauds, but many others were downright dangerous, often containing addictive and life-threatening ingredients. The most notorious example of this era was the promotion of arsenic-containing soaps and cosmetics.
In 1966, a small Welsh village is forever changed by a devastating event that shocks the nation. The Aberfan disaster, caused by the collapse of a colliery spoil tip, tragically resulted in the loss of 144 lives, the majority of whom were children. This heartbreaking incident not only highlighted the dangers of coal mining, but also showed a profound display of resilience and community spirit. A group of young schoolchildren had just begun mathematics lessons at Pantglass Junior School when a terrible rumble filled the air. Within moments, tons of liquefied coal waste tumbled down the hill