Why Trump’s First War Is Probably Going to Be a Conflict With North Korea | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Why Trump’s First War Is Probably Going to Be a Conflict With North Korea

The first definite sign that the current administration was going to take a different approach to North Korea, was when Secretary of State Rex Tillerson stated emphatically last month that “all options are on the table.”

“Let me be very clear. The policy of strategic patience has ended. We are exploring a new range of diplomatic, security and economic measures. All options are on the table,” Tillerson told reporters during a joint news conference with South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se on Friday.

“Certainly we do not want to, for things to get to military conflict,” Tillerson said.

However, he went on to say that “if they (North Korea) elevate the threat of their weapons program to a level that we believe requires action, then, that option’s on the table.”

He added that a “comprehensive set of capabilities” is being developed to deal with the country.

And at least one of those options is already in place. Before that interview even took place, US special forces were already training to decapitate the North Korean regime.

I don’t think that China could ever convince North Korea to give up its nuclear program. Kim Jong-un saw what happened to countries like Libya and Iraq after they abandoned their WMD programs. And North Korea is probably just as afraid of regime change at the hands of China as they are of America, because China would prefer a buffer state that is much more obedient and prosperous (and you know, not armed with nukes that at the command of a lunatic). Even North Korea’s closest friend is kind of an enemy, and they need capable nukes to defend themselves from China as well.

So if China can’t convince them to give up their nukes, and the United States won’t tolerate a nuclear armed North Korea, then there’s only two possible outcomes. Either our government is going to blink in this standoff, or there’s going to be war.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

There is a third outcome this writer does not mention, and that is, to work with China to get North Korea; South Korea; China; and the US into negotiations about replacing the armistice with a true peace treaty, with the quid pro quo that North Korea would stop its nuclear weapons program.

IF major nations of the world can take away the "fear factor", which is driving Kim Jung Un's relentless moves toward guideable, nuclear missiles as a deterrent, then perhaps peace does have a chance here.

Much is riding on the meetings this weekend between President Trump and China's President Xi Jinping: I hope these meetings are dedicated to positive outcomes to the mutual issues the US and China wish to resolve, and peace on the North Korean peninsula has to be darned near the top of both of their lists.

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