Thought for the day

"I contend that for a nation to try and tax itself into prosperity, is like a man standing in a bucket and trying to lift himself up by the handle." -- Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

donate

A group of 38 members of US Congress has sent a letter to the Biden administration, urging Washington to press Saudi Arabia and its allies to lift a blockade on Yemen, as the negotiated truce expired and led to fears of a return to fighting in the years-long conflict.

Sunday night was one of the toughest endured by Yemenis for months, as they waited for the news that the truce between their country’s warring parties had been extended. They were left disappointed.

As the deadline passed, minds began to wander. Would the boom of relentless air strikes become commonplace again? Will the availability of fuel get even worse? What will happen to our sons on the frontlines?

They would soon hear that clashes and shelling resumed across the country, including Taiz, Marib and al-Dhale.

On Sunday, UN Envoy for Yemen Hans Grundberg expressed “regret” over the failure of Yemen’s warring parties to extend a nationwide ceasefire agreed in April, and called on both sides to “fulfill their obligation to the Yemeni people to pursue every avenue for peace.” The Houthis and Yemen’s Gulf State-backed government have been at war since 2015.

The UN special envoy for Yemen said Sunday that the ceasefire between the Houthis and the US-backed Saudi-led coalition expired on Sunday without the two sides agreeing on an extension.

The truce was extended twice before, and while there was some fighting on the ground, no Saudi airstrikes in Yemen were reported, marking the longest period of calm in the war since the US-backed coalition intervened in 2015.

The Yemeni government said Thursday it has signed a deal worth $200 million with Saudi Arabia to provide fuel to war-torn Yemen.

Under the deal, the Saudi Development and Reconstruction Program for Yemen (SDRPY) will provide 250,000 metric tons of oil derivatives to Yemen, the state news agency Saba reported.

Saba said the deal will help increase the capabilities of Yemeni government institutions and the stability of electric power in various government and private institutions and the industrial sector.

The UN envoy for Yemen on Tuesday warned of the risk of more fighting breaking out in Yemen if the warring parties don’t agree to extend the current ceasefire, which is due to expire on October 2.